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9 mm vs. .40 S&W, which is better??

mnrobitaille

Regular Member
Joined
Jul 7, 2015
Messages
292
Location
Kahlotus, WA
Without getting into the weeds I'll just say that I prefer to shoot and carry .45 acp, but because of ammo prices I have been mostly shooting 9mm for the last few years. I have never been a .40 fan due to cost, muzzle flip and ammo inventory. I just didn't see enough advantage in barrier penetration to justify all that.

But then I shot my buddy's M&P Shield chambered in .40. I like it better than the Shield in 9mm, the XDS .45 acp, the XD Mod2 9mm, to name a few I've shot pretty much side by side with the Shield .40 over the last few years. I don't know what it is about that particular gun, but it is the only .40 I have ever really enjoyed shooting despite it's diminutive size and follow-ups are as quick as any similar size 9mm for me. Besides that, I just haven't found a .40 I prefer to my existing options.
For a bit of background, to start things off, I started this thread cause I used to carry the Smith & Wesson M&P Shield 9. I, however, traded it for a Smith & Wesson M&P Shield .40 as the gentleman that had the .40 didn't like the recoil or the feel.

I don't know the why or the how, but I seem to be able to shoot more proficiently with the .40 compared to the 9. Currently for SD, I am using the Federal Personal Defense 180 gr. JHP & when practicing been using Winchester 165 gr. FMJ.

As a back-up SD, I have Hornady Critical Duty 175 gr. FlexLock.

As evidenced by responses, so far, it's all in the eye of the beholder of which is preferred.
 

Firearms Iinstuctor

Regular Member
Joined
Jul 12, 2011
Messages
3,205
Location
northern wis
.

As evidenced by responses, so far, it's all in the eye of the beholder of which is preferred.
Very true

I have carried every thing from a 22rf up my 44 mag it is all depending on what I am doing.

This week is was a 1911 45, a Glock 23 and a Ti 41 mag. I did take my XD 5.25 out back and run a few mag's also

Next week as I am going on a wilderness camping trip it well be my Ti. 41 mag all week. I could take one of my stainless 357s or 44s but I really don't plan on shooting any thing.

The Ti 41 only comes in at 27oz and the 210 hard cast I load in it is plenty to smash through any problem critters I might run into.

So yes it is all in the eye of the beholder.
 

Big Gay Al

Michigan Moderator
Joined
Aug 27, 2006
Messages
1,954
Location
Mason, Michigan, USA
Sometimes it's the firearm. I had a Taurus PT940, which is .40 S&W. I felt it had excessive muzzle flip. But now I carry the FNX-45, and find it's recoil milder than the 1911 in .45ACP, so I'm tempted to try the FNX-40 as well. The overall design of the FNX series seems to work at dampening felt recoil more than "traditional" firearms. I don't know why. But that's how it feels.
 

Grapeshot

Legendary Warrior
Joined
May 21, 2006
Messages
35,337
Location
Valhalla
Sometimes it's the firearm. I had a Taurus PT940, which is .40 S&W. I felt it had excessive muzzle flip. But now I carry the FNX-45, and find it's recoil milder than the 1911 in .45ACP, so I'm tempted to try the FNX-40 as well. The overall design of the FNX series seems to work at dampening felt recoil more than "traditional" firearms. I don't know why. But that's how it feels.
The center line of the barrel plays a major part. The closer to your hand, the less muzzle flip, the less felt recol.

"...Also bore axis will effect muzzle rise or flip as well as weight on the front of the gun. XDM has a pretty high bore axis sig has an even higher bore axis. I have the tungsten guide rod and never noticed a difference but I slapped a TLR2 on the front of my sig and that made a noticeable difference. Keeping your hand as high up as you can lowers the bore axis and helps to control the muzzle flip."
http://www.xdtalk.com/threads/looking-to-eliminate-muzzle-flip.214688/
 

Firearms Iinstuctor

Regular Member
Joined
Jul 12, 2011
Messages
3,205
Location
northern wis
Of the 3 45acp handguns I have the XD 5.25 has the softest recoil impulse.

When I put the compensator on my full 1911 that well come close but the XD still beats it as far as the lowest recoil impulse and is faster to get back on target.
 

WalkingWolf

Regular Member
Joined
Jul 31, 2011
Messages
11,912
Location
North Carolina
The center line of the barrel plays a major part. The closer to your hand, the less muzzle flip, the less felt recol.

"...Also bore axis will effect muzzle rise or flip as well as weight on the front of the gun. XDM has a pretty high bore axis sig has an even higher bore axis. I have the tungsten guide rod and never noticed a difference but I slapped a TLR2 on the front of my sig and that made a noticeable difference. Keeping your hand as high up as you can lowers the bore axis and helps to control the muzzle flip."
http://www.xdtalk.com/threads/looking-to-eliminate-muzzle-flip.214688/
I have been shooting plow handle revolvers since I was a teenager, actually I prefer muzzle flip to the jarring impact of straight line recoil. It seems maybe to just me that there is more complaints with lost motor skills with the newer low bore axis pistols. A good example is the very low bore axis PPK, and clones. In alloy frames the impact is almost uncomfortable, and thousands of rounds probably would result in tendon damage.

Just me, but the most comfortable, and less straight line impact, and muzzle flip pistols are Hi Points. Those slides weighing a pound really soak it up. Next in the line up are both my Star Super, and 1911, both much less impact, and flip than a plastic fantastic, steel soaks up recoil. A inexpensive ring of fire Jimenez also has less recoil than a plastic fantastic, heavy zamac just soaks it up, while a LCP pounds the hand. She tried both, and ended up with a JA380, until I replaced it with a SMC 380. The SMC though is taxing to shoot though, alloy frame.

My wife hated her Glock 22 because of problems it caused her wrist. It was sold, and replaced with a compact Witness in the hated 380 caliber, it is a joy to shoot, and she OC's it whenever possible. It replaced her carry of my vintage police positive which I worried about due to it's long history, and age.
 
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Beretta92fsQueer

Regular Member
Joined
Jul 5, 2017
Messages
37
Location
Somewhere over the rainbow
I have been shooting plow handle revolvers since I was a teenager, actually I prefer muzzle flip to the jarring impact of straight line recoil. It seems maybe to just me that there is more complaints with lost motor skills with the newer low bore axis pistols. A good example is the very low bore axis PPK, and clones. In alloy frames the impact is almost uncomfortable, and thousands of rounds probably would result in tendon damage.

Just me, but the most comfortable, and less straight line impact, and muzzle flip pistols are Hi Points. Those slides weighing a pound really soak it up. Next in the line up are both my Star Super, and 1911, both much less impact, and flip than a plastic fantastic, steel soaks up recoil. A inexpensive ring of fire Jimenez also has less recoil than a plastic fantastic, heavy zamac just soaks it up, while a LCP pounds the hand. She tried both, and ended up with a JA380, until I replaced it with a SMC 380. The SMC though is taxing to shoot though, alloy frame.

My wife hated her Glock 22 because of problems it caused her wrist. It was sold, and replaced with a compact Witness in the hated 380 caliber, it is a joy to shoot, and she OC's it whenever possible. It replaced her carry of my vintage police positive which I worried about due to it's long history, and age.
Glock ought to make their grips more ergonomically friendly. I switched out my 92FS grips for something a bit more comfortable, and it feels great. Rubber grips soak up recoil as well.

The down side of the Glock v. 92FS is if my FS runs out of round I have a heap of metal I can use for grill smashing. Smacking someone with plastic...
 

Big Gay Al

Michigan Moderator
Joined
Aug 27, 2006
Messages
1,954
Location
Mason, Michigan, USA
Glock ought to make their grips more ergonomically friendly. I switched out my 92FS grips for something a bit more comfortable, and it feels great. Rubber grips soak up recoil as well.

The down side of the Glock v. 92FS is if my FS runs out of round I have a heap of metal I can use for grill smashing. Smacking someone with plastic...
I thought about that too, but like my FNX-45, the slide is still metal. Hit them with that, if you have to. :)
 

Va_Nemo

New member
Joined
May 1, 2016
Messages
542
Location
Lynchburg
Over penetration is just an issue with the straight claw hammer claws, as shown. Curved claws and ball peens are do not really have the penetration issue.

Nemo
 
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