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American Made Firearms

Custodian

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Look at all the big names today in firearm manufacturers. Glock, H&K, Sig, FN, AK, Beretta, Walther (yeah, I know this one is a S&W imprint now), Taurus, Bersa, etc.

They pretty much have the biggest chunk of the firearms market.

The old names of the American made firearms are met with reluctance and resistance when they develop something new or take a concept and try a new angle (Smith & Wesson auto-loaders usually fit in this category).

People constantly complains about the economy but the fact is if you don't buy something made here in the U.S. you really can't complain about much. Your money, even if the factory is here will be sailing out of the country at warp speed. Money put into a America might have a good chance of staying, I hope. However, when it comes to your personal defense, should it matter? Is this a place where you trust foriegn intellect more so than good ol' American knowhow? Also, American made usually costs quite a pretty penny more so than that which came over on a ship or they simply are trying to sell you a name that has long ago been decayed (Colt anyone?).

Simply put, is it worth buying American (we'll limit this one to firearms) made? If not, why (I don't see alot of talk about the hottest Chinese firearms)? What needs to be changed? Why are some companies simply living off their name and not doing more to please prospective buyers?
 

longwatch

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With the current weakness of the dollar making foreign goods more expensive, it does pay to buy American.
 

Flintlock

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Custodian wrote:
Look at all the big names today in firearm manufacturers. Glock, H&K, Sig, FN, AK, Beretta, Walther (yeah, I know this one is a S&W imprint now), Taurus, Bersa, etc.

They pretty much have the biggest chunk of the firearms market.

The old names of the American made firearms are met with reluctance and resistance when they develop something new or take a concept and try a new angle (Smith & Wesson auto-loaders usually fit in this category).

People constantly complains about the economy but the fact is if you don't buy something made here in the U.S. you really can't complain about much. Your money, even if the factory is here will be sailing out of the country at warp speed. Money put into a America might have a good chance of staying, I hope. However, when it comes to your personal defense, should it matter? Is this a place where you trust foriegn intellect more so than good ol' American knowhow? Also, American made usually costs quite a pretty penny more so than that which came over on a ship or they simply are trying to sell you a name that has long ago been decayed (Colt anyone?).

Simply put, is it worth buying American (we'll limit this one to firearms) made? If not, why (I don't see alot of talk about the hottest Chinese firearms)? What needs to be changed? Why are some companies simply living off their name and not doing more to please prospective buyers?

All of those manufacturers have a target market that they advertise to specifically. Ruger is the leading American gun manufacturer with over $168 million in sales and is growing. their target market is much larger and more diverse.It is alsothe only American manufacturer that produces pistols, revolvers, rifles, and shotguns.

http://www.answers.com/topic/sturm-ruger-company?cat=biz-fin

Also, Remington is the oldest gun manufacturer in the US and is still hangingaround. And also what about Springfield Armory, Kimber, kahr, Bushmaster, andKel-tec? We are still doing ok..

Yes, the companies you mentioned do have a large impact on sales here in America but they also produce incredible weapons for military, competition, defense, CCW, etc.as ours do. But in my opinion, they advertize better and they win more military and police contracts which apparently sways the public view on what their next purchase might be. Additionally, companies like Smith & Wesson that sell out to the politicians does nothing to help their long-term cause and helps with distrust among firearms enthusiasts.
 

bourneshooter

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, Nevada, USA
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Flintlock wrote:
Custodian wrote:
...

Also, Remington is the oldest gun manufacturer in the US and is still hangingaround. And also what about Springfield Armory, Kimber, kahr, Bushmaster, andKel-tec? We are still doing ok..

...
FYI, Remington bought Marlin last year. Right before that, Bushmaster bought out Hornady. Shortly after that, Cerebes (sic) bought both Bushmaster and Remington. Cerebes (Sic) is the company that bought out Daimler Chrysler.

5 bucks if anyone can find out who is behind Cerebes (sic) and if there is any motive beyond the economic one.
 

longwatch

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http://www.downrange.tv/artman2/publish/shepherd/159.shtml

Remington To Close H&R Plant
By Jim Shepherd
Apr 8, 2008 - 1:19:36 AM

It’s billed as a “manufacturing consolidation” but to the 200-plus workers at what used to be the H&R 1971 –now- Remington Arms’ Gardner, Massachusetts plant, it’s a closure. For most of them, it means outplacement assistance. That’s a corporate pseudonym for unemployment.

Yesterday, confirming rumors that had been swirling about for the past three weeks, Remington’s CEO Tommy Milner issued a short press release saying that the Gardner plan would be closed by the end of 2008. “A number” of employees will be transitioned from Gardner to other positions within the company, but the majority will be offered the severance, outplacement and referral services that accompany a shutdown.

“While it was a difficult decision to close Gardner, we believe that this consolidation will enhance our ability to more efficiently provide quality products at competitive prices in an increasingly demanding global marketplace,” Millner, wrote in the short release.

“We are always looking for ways to strengthen and optimize our business in order to stay competitive, while also creating additional opportunities for our employees and better products for customers. Our number one goal is to provide our customers and end-users with the best, most innovative products at a competitive price. Consolidation of manufacturing capabilities and migration to common operating systems are expected to create efficiencies that will achieve this goal.”

From a traditional industry perspective, the decision is certainly a head-scratcher.

H&R 1871 has a reputation of showing a modest, but continuing profitability. Many in the industry felt that, as is the ultimate owner, Cerberus Capital’s habit (they own Remington), the Marlin/H&R 1871 operations would continue, receiving support from the Remington infrastructure as well as its considerable raw materials purchasing power. At least for the time being.

In Gardner, Mayor Mark Hawke has called the move by Remington a “travesty.” Hawke, too, maintains H&R has always been a profitable company.

“Now,” he says, “Remington comes in and they’re going to close them.”

Hawke is livid at the fact Remington didn’t bother to give local officials a courtesy call on the closing, letting them learn about the closure when the public announcement was made yesterday.

Likewise, Massachusetts officials say no one from Remington ever contacted them about their plans.

The Outdoor Wire contacted Remington, and we were told there would be “no further comment at this time” on the decision.

With this closure, it may be that Remington brings the paranoia concerning Cerberus Capital Partners from an undercurrent in the firearms industry to a front-and-center position.

Some industry leaders have expressed concern regarding the privately-held behemoth and its sudden – and very significant – entry into the firearms industry. Despite the stated love of the shooting industry, officials at other companies are privately concerned that Cerberus has sufficient resources to either bolster the firearms industry - or cripple it.

Now, with Remington, Marlin, H&R 1871, New England Firearms, LC Smith, Parker, Bushmaster, Cobb and DPMS already under the Cerberus umbrella, the speculation will likely grow.

We’ll keep you posted.

--Jim Shepherd
http://www.shootingwire.com

http://www.theoutdoorwire.com
 

Evil Ernie

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Nov 18, 2007
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Castle Rock, Colorado, USA
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Out of the 14 firearms I own, only 5 are US made; Both Hi Points, the Mossberg 590, Remington 870, and the TC Hawkens rifle. Four are WWII rifles (Mausers, Enfield, M/N) so they really don't qualify as they are collectors items. The two SKS's, the WASR, and the Taurus' definitely fall into the Foreign made category for this thread purposes I believe.
As far as when it comes to protecting myself and mine, I don't care where it's made, the most dependable, powerful, reliable, etc., that's within my budget will get my $$.
 

Felid`Maximus

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Nov 12, 2007
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Reno, Nevada, USA
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Of the guns in the house I live in,twoare foreign designed and domestically manufactured (foreign parent company), three are entirely made in the USA (including my carry gun), three are made in foreign countriesmore than60years ago, and I don't believe any of those three countries still have the same government that they did back then.
 

imperialism2024

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Hmm, well if you include the guns that I sold in a private transaction or that mysteriously disappeared (*cough cough*), I have 4 American, 1 Chinese, 8 Russian/Soviet, 4 assorted Eastern Bloc. I mean, I'll gladly buy more American guns if they'll chamber them in 7.62x39 and 7.62x54R...
 

eyesopened

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I've purchased "American" made pistols from Springfield, but they've outsourced them. One is the XD and that is a Croation creation. The other is an EMP, while assembled in the US, it is forged in Brazil. The AR I'm building is going to be all American if I can help it...
 

savery

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, Virginia, USA
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When it comes to guns, I buy the good shit and really don't pay too much attention to where it's made.

Even then... just because it's an american company doesn't mean it's american made. Case in point: Remove the grip from my "Springfield Armory" 1911 and see "Imbel Brazil" engraved in the frame...

I refuse to own anything other than an Amercan car, however. But day by day i belive this is dumber and dumber considering 1. The amount of stupid crap and poor engineering the american car companies are pumping out, and 2. by buying American cars you are just helping to fuel the socialist unions.

You can't win.
 

Michigander

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savery wrote:
by buying American cars you are just helping to fuel the socialist unions.

You can't win.

What is so socialist about unions? Based on what I've seen and been a part of, Unions represent folks who work hard, and in exchange get their members benefits and wages they can support their families on. As far as I know, socialism means paying for everyone to have certain things like health insurance and school, whether or not they work. In the case of my union, I bust my ass for health insurance and a decent wage. I earn my money the hard way, and in doing so I pay for what the union sets me up with, health care and a pension, paid for by me alone, with my dues.

I'll be the first to agree that the auto unions have messed up bad, and I do know of some stupid socialistic practices that the auto unions have taken part in, but I don't see the socialism in the majority of unions.

As for American guns, I normally buy used, so I don't really care. However, in my every day life, I buy as much US made products as I can. I figure I want a job as bad as the next guy in the US, so I try to avoid places like Walmart and other clearing houses for China's garbage. The working men and women in the US should stick together. Just today I bought a US made holster.
 

savery

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Michigander wrote:
savery wrote:
by buying American cars you are just helping to fuel the socialist unions.

You can't win.

What is so socialist about unions? Based on what I've seen and been a part of, Unions represent folks who work hard, and in exchange get their members benefits and wages they can support their families on. As far as I know, socialism means paying for everyone to have certain things like health insurance and school, whether or not they work. In the case of my union, I bust my ass for health insurance and a decent wage. I earn my money the hard way, and in doing so I pay for what the union sets me up with, health care and a pension, paid for by me alone, with my dues.

I'll be the first to agree that the auto unions have messed up bad, and I do know of some stupid socialistic practices that the auto unions have taken part in, but I don't see the socialism in the majority of unions.

As for American guns, I normally buy used, so I don't really care. However, in my every day life, I buy as much US made products as I can. I figure I want a job as bad as the next guy in the US, so I try to avoid places like Walmart and other clearing houses for China's garbage. The working men and women in the US should stick together. Just today I bought a US made holster.
My specific complaint is with UAW. and by socialist, well, just look at who they stand behind every election. Catch my drift?

I'll be honest - in theory, I don't think unions are an inherantly bad Idea. Why? Because I think unions are a better fit in capitalism than OSHA, minimum wages, and labor laws in general. But unfortunately, I think they've gotten a bit too big and out of line for what they were originally designed for.

I also buy most of my guns used. I've bought a few brand new, but not many. Makes a lot more economic sense that way....
 

nova

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I have 12 guns right now, and only 4 of them are foreign. One from Bulgaria, Hungary, Spain, and Argentina. The rest are American made :cool: and I didn't pick them just for being US made, but also because the gun itself fit what I wanted in that particular market...many times over :lol:
 

imperialism2024

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Add one in the "foreign" category for me.

Went to a gun show today... and I'm now the proud father of a bouncing baby AK with wood furniture. I hope it gets along with the plastic furnitured, underfolding, and bullpup AKs...

:)

Almost went with an M1 Garand though. But the AK was whispering "Pick me! Pick me!"



ETA: But when I buy myself a Barrett M82 this summer, can that count as two American guns? :lol:
 
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